The Masters

Last month’s Sports Viz Sunday was the Masters. I created 3 different vizzes using Tableau public.

The first one I created looked at how closely contested the Masters usually is. I’ve always felt that Masters Sunday was the best TV viewing day of the year and looking at the data backed that up. The tournament has only been won by 5 strokes or more 5 times.

Overall I like how this turned out. The one thing I would change is the title. I don’t feel that it gives a good take-a-way of what the viz is about.

A Brief History of Champions at The Masters(1)

The next one I did was on Tiger’s 1997 win. Tiger won by 12 strokes the largest margin of victory (as of this post). I wanted to see round by round how much better Tiger was than the average score for the day. Tiger is known for wearing red and black on Sundays and I used the color scheme in honor of that.

This is a simple viz and the goal was to highlight how good his 2nd and 3rd rounds were in relation to the field average score. There was a Twitter discussion about showing the better score on the bottom of the viz. In golf being under par is good and while it may seem strange to see better on the bottom I think it make sense when you are looking at golf scores. If I was showing tournament position (first place, second place etc.) it makes sense to show them at the top, but, I believe when showing in relation to par at the bottom of the viz makes more sense.

Tiger Woods 1997 Masters(2)

The 3rd viz looked at 1956 Masters where Jackie Burke Jr started Sunday 8 strokes behind Ken Venturi and came back to win by 1 stroke. I wanted to show round by round how well Venturi played for the first 3 rounds and how steady Burke was. I’d like to do a more in depth analysis on this to show how great Burke’s final round was. There were only 2 players under par on Sunday and Bobby Jones said it was the toughest weather conditions the Masters had been played in. This is my favorite of the 3 and hopefully I’ll expand upon this with a more in depth analysis.

1956 Masters(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t Underestimate the Power of the Bar

I was excited that Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic’s Storytelling with Data current challenge is to create a basic bar chart. She says “The #SWDchallenge this month is to create a basic bar chart. Nothing fancy. No need to stack it or do anything else crazy.” I love a good bar chart and have been known to say “don’t underestimate the power of the bar” more than once.

For this challenge I used data from the 2017 Masters to show which holes had the highest percent of scores over par.

2017 Hardest Holes at the Masters2

At first, I sorted the data in descending order so the top three were together at the top of the chart. For other data sets I think this works, but, for this I liked keeping the holes ordered by the hole number.

I debated the bar color for the top 3 for a while. I wanted to use the green to tie with the Masters theme. I decided against that because people tend to associate green with good – if I were showing the 3 easiest I would have used that. I tried orange, a maroon-ish red, dark gray, and brown but I didn’t love any of those choices. I had my husband look and he suggested that I color code them in multiple shades. Instead of shutting that down immediately I changed the scheme to show him what it would look like and asked do the top 3 still stand out? When he agreed that it didn’t, I switched it back to a two color scheme and he suggested the purple and I think it pops.

Initially, I labeled the bars and tested out different alignments. I felt that the chart was too busy with the bars labeled. I needed to add the percent over par to the chart so I added it next to the hole name. To do this in Tableau add your measure to the row shelf and change it to discrete.

I don’t have any annotations on this chart and if you aren’t familiar with golf over par may not resonate with you.  I am sure some folks would suggest adding text to explain over par but I opted not to because I liked the clean look and felt that my title got the point of the chart across.

To see other entries for this challenge take a look at #swdchallenge on Twitter.

Also take time to check out Cole’s website and buy the Storytelling with Data book.

 

Rank and Magnitude Dashboard

If you don’t have the Big Book of Dashboards yet you are missing out. Steve Wexler, Jeffrey Shaffer, and Andy Cotgreave  put together a fantastic resource for Business Dashboards.

I used the BBOD to help solve a request to show both the ranking and magnitude for a 12 week snapshot and also show that by different groups. Chapter 22 in the book walks through this type of scenario.

This is an example of what I created – all of the information below is fake. The chart on the left shows the ranking and controls what is highlighted in the chart on the right. The bar chart about the chart on the right appears when something is selected on the left. This was added to make it easier for the user to compare the volume across the groups.A big thanks to Steve who helped me with this addition!

MagRank

This design isn’t flashy but it serves a specific purpose and it has been well received by the end users. I will probably adjust the fonts, titles, and colors a bit more but will keep the main design as it is.

I’d love to hear your feedback or ideas on this!

I Love Parameters

I spent time with a couple of co-workers yesterday going through revisions on an existing dashboard and received valuable constructive feedback. One person said the visuals are great and you built exactly what I asked for but I find it hard to answer questions – I end up having to do the work in Excel.

The thing they struggled with the most was looking at before and after a specific date. They needed the ability to pick the date to pivot off of and the ability to select the number of days back and forward to look at.

This was a good challenge for me and after thinking it over for a while I thought that parameters were exactly what I needed.

My idea was to create a parameter for the X date (the date to look back and forward from) and then create a parameter for the days back and the days forward and use those to limit the dates in the chart and use them to calculate the before and after measures they were looking for.

My Parameters are:

  • Selected Date – date to pivot back and forward from (date)
  • Days Back – # of days to go back (integer)
  • Days Forward – # of days to go forward (integer)

My Calculated fields are:

  • Back Date – [Selected Date] – [Days Back]
  • Forward Date – [Selected Date] + [Days Forward]
  • Custom Date Range – IF [Order Date] >= [Back Date]
    AND [Order Date] <= [Forward Date]
    THEN [Order Date]
    END

I then added the Custom Date range to the filters to exclude the nulls. To exclude the nulls I added the Custom Date dimension and selected Range of Dates > Special > Non Null

I used these fields to create a line chart to show the trend during the custom date range and added a reference line for the selected date. I also create a metric tile to show the before and after counts and changes in those counts. I added a few other charts to help them see what changed by different dimensions.

I love the flexibility with parameters!

I wanted to see if I could figure this out without Googling how to do this. I’d love to know if there is an easier way to do this or if I over engineered the solution.

 

Design Thinking

I was an early Tableau adopter in work and tried to push my end users out of their Excel data dump comfort zone. I would correct people who referred to Tableau as Excel on steroids on a regular basis. I was excited about giving my users a visual representation of their data. But, I kept getting asked to add table view of the data. I would add these views, but, I wouldn’t make them as pretty as the dashboards in hopes that people would use the dashboards instead. But that wasn’t the case, when I looked at Tableau server the most viewed sheets were the boring pivot table views.

I didn’t give up and kept plowing ahead and improving my Tableau skills. I’ve been trying to learn as much as I can about colors, charts, telling stories, LOD calculations, parameters and all the other things that go along with Tableau. I started to convert more users to the visual side and away from the table views. When someone wanted to know how to export the raw data my canned response was what do you need it for. I wanted to make the dashboard helpful for them. I felt like I was making some progress.

My goal with Tableau was to make it easier for the end users to quickly see what they need and allow them to interact and customize the dashboards but I felt like I was missing something – was I really giving them what they needed? Was I giving a solution without really knowing what they needed?

To help me solve that question I attended a Design Thinking Bootcamp class at General Assembly. The class was helpful and gave me a number of ideas on how I can change my approach.

Here are a few of the concepts that stood out to me:

  • ask open ended questions to the end user
  • silence is fine – if you ask a question and the user stops to think – let them think don’t interject other ideas or options
  • pay attention to work-arounds – these are areas the need isn’t being met
  • after you understand the need develop your point of view with the user and their need (not solution). someone who can’t reach the top shelf doesn’t need a ladder they need the item on the top shelf.
  • get the topic and ideas out on paper – make this a free flowing exercise – no judgements!
  • prototype – shouldn’t be a finalized version. It should be used to communicate the idea. be prepared to scrap it and start over – we don’t always get it right on the first go round.
  • build your story – who is the user, what is the challenge they face, how does that challenge impact them, what is the solution, how does it meet the need

It was helpful for me to be reminded that you need to fully understand the need and develop a lot of ideas around the need before jumping to a solution.

 

Make over Monday Week 5

Trying to get caught up on the Makeover Monday exercises from the last couple of weeks. I just finished week 5 which was on employment in the G7 countries. The original viz showed two pie charts on employment share and net employment growth in the G7 countries from 2010 – 2016

g7original

From reading the article the more important data point appeared to be the share of net employment growth in the US. I decided to turn that pie chart into a bar chart because I find it easier to see the differences in values with a bar chart than in a pie chart. I also adjusted the thickness of the bar to correspond to the measure. I kept the share of total employment in my remake as a reference point – I wanted the focus to be on the net share of employment so I added the share of total employment as a table. You can view the workbook on my Tableau public site.

g7mom

In both my MOM and work dashboards I am starting to use the same theme. I like the clean look and find it easier to read dashboards on a light background. I think the darker backgrounds can be beautiful when they are done right but I have a hard time reading them and sometimes find them distracting. I’m getting new glasses in a few weeks and maybe when I get my progressives I’ll change my mind but for now I’m sticking with the light background!

New Zealand RTI Makeover Monday

Back from vacation and catching up on the last two Makeover Monday exercises. I tried the New Zealand RTI one from week 4 first.

The first thing I created was a line chart that showed the RTI by visitor type by period. I filtered the dashboard to just the Total Region and excluded 2008 from the chart. The definitions listed RTI as the change in expenditure by Region comparing the month to the average month in 2008, so, I figured 2008 didn’t need to be included.

There were a lot of options with this data set and I spent longer than it may seem on this one. The thing I kept coming back to was the difference in the RTI in Winter between domestic and international visitors. So after reading a lot about New Zealand weather I decided to go with that.

The viz itself is simple – a line chart to show the RTI trends by visitor type and a list of the 10 Regions with the largest difference in RTI between domestic and international visitors during the winter months.

nzmom

Let me know if you think I missed the mark here or have any suggestions or feedback!

 

make over Monday week 3

This week’s MakeOverMonday was the first time I have used Twitter data. The objective was to rebuild a Buzz Feed depiction of Trump’s retweets. The thing I love about MakeOverMonday is that it pushes me outside of the data sets I use in work – I’m not sure I got everything right this week but because this is my “Tableau play time” I’m going with what I built.

This is the dashboard I ended up with:trumptweetsThe retweets by day chart is a Gantt chart and I’m not sure that it is the best visualization but I thought it looked like a city skyline and thought that fit into the Trump theme. I think it conveys the point that the number of Tweets Trump is retweeting has decreased since he announced his candidacy in June 2015.

The original data set looked at the users Trump was retweeting and I wanted to keep with that so I created the bar chart that shows the number of times he has retweeted that user with a color coding for before and after. I filtered this to people he retweeted 10 or more times. I thought it was interesting that the only person in his inner circle who met that criteria and who he retweeted before the announcement was @danscavino. I don’t have enough time or information to figure out why that is but I thought it was interesting.

I exceeded the time limit I set for myself this week so I’m going with what I built.